University of Kentucky College of Agriculture

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Kentucky 4-H agents take on national leadership roles

Cooperative Extension Service 4-H News - Tue, 12/16/2014 - 4:33pm
Teaser:  <p>A trio of Kentuckians have accepted leadership positions within the National Association of Extension 4-H agents.</p>

A trio of Kentuckians have accepted leadership positions within the National Association of Extension 4-H agents.

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Fun ways to make holiday breaks more enjoyable without technology

State 4-H Blog - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 10:37am

Contact: Jennifer Tackett, extension specialist for 4-H youth development

The holidays are a wonderful time for family togetherness, but after a few days, everyone, no matter their age, begins to look for distractions. In a world of smart phones, tablets and laptops, many times our attention turns to technology, but it doesn’t have to be this way. It is possible to keep young people active and engaged without technology.

You can use the holidays as a way to help your family get active. Activities like sledding, snowball fights, building a snowman, shoveling snow and skiing are all great outdoor activities that promote a healthy lifestyle. If snow and cold weather aren’t appealing or no snow is available, you can always get your family active indoors. Possible indoor activities include stretching, dancing and home decorating projects. Trips to the museum, bowling alley, gym or mall can provide a healthy dose of fun, physical activity.

Use the holidays to develop a shared interest with your children. Share one of your favorite hobbies with them. Cook or bake with them and let them choose the recipe and measure the ingredients. If you have children who are craftsy, teach them how to make jewelry, paint, draw characters or make friendship bracelets.

Imagination can also make the time fly by. Some great ways to engage your young person’s imagination is to have them write or act out a play, put on a talent show or build an indoor fort.

Don’t forget to put aside a day or two where you and your family do nothing but read, watch movies, play board games and rest. This can help you and your child feel recharged and ready to return to school and work after the holidays.

For more information on raising productive young people, contact the (COUNTY NAME) Extension office.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, sex, religion, disability or national origin.


First Lady Jane Beshear announces new cooking series designed for young students

Cooperative Extension Service 4-H News - Mon, 11/17/2014 - 2:20pm
Teaser:  <p>The cooking demonstration series &quot;Plant, Harvest, Eat&quot; features students preparing easy and delicious recipes using Kentucky-grown, raised and value-added food products.</p>

The cooking demonstration series "Plant, Harvest, Eat" features students preparing easy and delicious recipes using Kentucky-grown, raised and value-added food products.

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Cell phones and young people

State 4-H Blog - Fri, 11/14/2014 - 10:34am

Contact: Mark Mains, extension specialist for 4-H youth development and netsmartz.org

Technology has advanced at such a rapid pace that our lives are very different than they were even 10 years ago. Responsible technology usage is now a conversation you must have with your child.

Ten years ago, some high school students had cell phones, but in 2010, a Pew study revealed that 58 percent of all 12-year-olds had a cell phone.

While cell phones are an easy way for you to stay in contact with your child, they do come with their own sets of risks. As a parent, it’s your responsibility to teach your child how to wisely and safely use a cell phone before they receive one. Establish rules of when and how the phone should be used and acceptable websites and apps. Remind them to think before they text. While texting may seem more private than social media, pictures and texts can easily be forwarded and put on social media. Insist that they never respond to any texts, friend requests or calls from unknown numbers. Encourage them not to put their cell phone number or password anywhere online.

Review cell phone records for any unknown numbers or late night calls or texts made to your child’s phone. Cell phone providers may offer additional security measures. Contact your provider to learn about any additional protections that they offer.

Age should not determine when your child receives a cell phone; your and your child’s unique situation should. You should consider whether a cell phone is needed to communicate more easily with your child and that your child can use the phone responsibly. Make sure your child understands the rules that come with using a cell phone and the consequences for breaking those rules before they get a phone.

More information on raising healthy, safe kids in a changing world is available at (YOUR COUNTY) Cooperative Extension office.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, sex, religion, disability or national origin.


Atkinson receives National Guard volunteer award

Cooperative Extension Service 4-H News - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 3:44pm
Teaser:  <p>UKAg&#39;s Tyrone Atkinson was recently honored for his contributions to military youth development.</p>

UKAg's Tyrone Atkinson was recently honored for his contributions to military youth development.

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4-H develops leaders through state teen council

State 4-H Blog - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 2:42pm

Contact: Mark Mains, extension specialist for 4-H youth development

Throughout their 4-H careers, members have numerous opportunities to learn how to become better leaders. One of those opportunities is serving as a representative on State 4-H Teen Council.

State teen council gives young people who already possess leadership potential, the chance to refine their communication and leadership skills. Council members are chosen by their extension district and serve two-year terms. Six council members are chosen from each of the state’s seven extension districts.  (STUDENT’S NAME) is a State 4-H Teen Council member from (COUNTY NAME).

While serving on the council, members serve as a sounding board for 4-H state teen programming efforts and issues.

They also assist with the planning and execution of two leadership building events, 4-H Summit and 4-H Teen Conference. During Summit, teen council members serve as mentors to middle school students. They also create and present a leadership workshop to Summit participants.

In addition, council representatives select an issue they want to address as a group.  This year’s issue is agriculture awareness. Council members will create a workshop and accompanying resource packet to give people a better understanding of the origins of their food and fiber.  The workshop will be taught at 4-H Summit and within their counties, the packet will also be available to anyone online. Past issues that council members have addressed include bullying, body image and safety.

By serving on state 4-H Teen council, young people also have the opportunity to give back to their county 4-H program by serving as trained leaders on the National Youth Science Day experiment each October.

For more information on criteria for joining state teen council or other 4-H leadership opportunities, contact the (COUNTY NAME) Cooperative Extension Service.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, sex, religion, disability or national origin.


4-H’ers have a blast during National Youth Science Day

State 4-H Blog - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 12:49pm

4-H’ers have a blast during National Youth Science Day

Contact: Jann Burks, extension specialist for 4-H youth development

Recently, (COUNTY NAME) 4-H’ers learned how creativity and a strong foundation in math and science can help them help others, when they participated in the 4-H National Youth Science Day experiment.

National Youth Science Day gives 4-H professionals and volunteers across the country an opportunity to get youth excited about science, math, engineering and technology and promote 4-H Science programs. Since 2008, more than 5 million young Americans have participated in National Youth Science Day.

This year’s national experiment was called Rockets to the Rescue. 4-H’ers were given a fictional scenario that required them to design and construct an aerodynamic aircraft capable of delivering food to national disaster victims on a remote island in the Pacific Ocean. They were to create the aircraft using common everyday items like recyclable two-liter bottles, cotton balls, pipe cleaners, rubber bands and a protractor. Building their rockets required them not only to use their science skills but also to learn about the effects of natural disasters and food security issues, which are emerging real-world problems.

4-H helps mold the leaders of tomorrow and a strong foundation in math and science can help young people pursue numerous careers where they could make positive contributions to mankind.

While the national day was Oct. 8, Kentucky 4-H is celebrating the day and conducting the experiment throughout the month. For more information about 4-H science and technology opportunities, contact your (COUNTY NAME) Cooperative Extension Service.

Educational programs of the Cooperative Extension Service serve all people regardless of race, color, sex, religion, disability or national origin.


Mountain Ag Week is Appalachian Proud

Cooperative Extension Service 4-H News - Thu, 09/04/2014 - 1:11pm
Teaser:  <p>Moutain Ag Week is packed with interactive learning for all ages.&nbsp;</p>

Moutain Ag Week is packed with interactive learning for all ages. 

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